PACE Airbrush Booth

Improve your Technique & Knowledge

Moderator: Geek44

User avatar
Whiterook
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7148
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 8:22 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA

PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby Whiterook » Tue Sep 02, 2014 7:24 pm

I highly recommend this line of airbrush spray booths.
http://pacepaintbooths.com/pace/

I own the 24-inch Mini-Plus, which was just under $300 USD, with free shipping, and worth every penny.

Image

148 CFM Shaded Pole Exhaust Fan
115 volt - 1.37 amp - 3,160 RPM
26 Gage Galvanized Sheet Metal Construction
4" Collar to Exhaust to Outside, up to 15 feet
Heavy Duty Power Switch
24" X 12" X 1" High Capacity Pleated Air Filter
One Year Warranty
Made in the U.S.A. by Pace Enterprises

Image

The Super-mini has more bells and whistles, at $385, but the basic model was enough for me (and I didn't want to shell out the extra $100+! :lol: ). and if ypu want to go whole hog, there's the Peasemaker Deluxe (I'd get it just for the name!!!)

So who's the man behind the design and manufacturer...

Bob Pace has been an independent businessman/entrepreneur for 35 years. In 1968 he started a heating and cooling business. Within a few years, he found he preferred to do sheet metal and ventilation work, so he started to fabricate and install commercial kitchen exhaust hood systems, and Pace Enterprises was born. Over the years, Bob has become one of the most sought after and respected ventilation contractors in the area.

In the early 1980's he discovered the need for a small home hobby spray booth. With his knowledge and expertise in ventilation and sheet metal fabrication, he came up with his own spray booth design made from sheet metal. The sturdy, yet light weight booth worked out so well, that friends who saw it started asking how they could get one. Bob then decided to start manufacturing the booth, for sale to the home hobbyist at an affordable price. Over time, his line has grown to three models, in three different sizes to accommodate the needs and size constraints of most modelers. These spray booths offer the highest quality materials and workmanship at a reasonable price, and are sure to yield years of service and satisfaction to the hobbyist, while protecting the family and work shop from dangerous paint and solvent fumes.


The booth works wonderfully, and doesn't take up a lot of space in the workshop. The motor is strong and dependable, and isn't loud. Another nice feature is, it uses a regular home furnace filter. Very sturdy, it has proved very dependable for me. It's a peach!
If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

User avatar
gibbs
Specialist
Specialist
Posts: 265
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 3:42 pm
Location: United Kingdom
Contact:

Re: PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby gibbs » Thu Jun 04, 2015 4:07 pm

They are a good thing but unfortunately I haven't got the room on my bench for one as the photo's of my bench in this thread show
http://militarywargaming.com/viewtopic.php?f=85&t=1851&sid=8d7fc97c951082d9764307bb85c33d46
This wasn't something I really thought about until I started airbrushing again and kept having a sore throat after luckily it was nothing to be alarmed about just my asthma not liking the paint fumes but I have been assured that because of the nature of the acrylic paint's I spray there is no lasting damage but as a precaution I decided to invest in some protection so after a chat with the online customer service rep for 3M I was able to establish what filter I would need based upon the sets they make for professional spray painters I purchased this
WP_20150604_20_49_10_Pro[2].jpg

and it has sorted the problem which has allowed me to experiment with some stronger chemicals such as lacquer based fillers like mr surfacer with no ill effects I've also taken to wearing nitrile gloves while I work on the kit's to protect my hands and to prevent finger prints getting on to hat I'm working on
My little corner of the internet
Image
https://thearmourfarm.wordpress.com

User avatar
Whiterook
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7148
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 8:22 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Re: PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby Whiterook » Sat Jul 25, 2015 2:20 pm

gibbs wrote:I have been assured that because of the nature of the acrylic paint's I spray there is no lasting damage ....


That is an awesome thread in iteself! I'd love to see you start a thread in the tips section, with a little more explaination of who assured you of this, and what specifically the details of the conversation was. The reason for this is, I too have looked into Acrylics' safety in use, and read that it is non-toxic to the point where fumes ingested are not harmful...but I've never seen that backed up....I just take it for info at it's word.


gibbs wrote:....but as a precaution I decided to invest in some protection so after a chat with the online customer service rep for 3M I was able to establish what filter I would need based upon the sets they make for professional spray painters I purchased.... [a professional filter mask]


BTW...I too use a similar mask, even though I use a spray booth! :D And as well, I also use rubber gloves at all times when building and painting. I believe that is indispensible!
If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

User avatar
gibbs
Specialist
Specialist
Posts: 265
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 3:42 pm
Location: United Kingdom
Contact:

Re: PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby gibbs » Sat Jul 25, 2015 8:34 pm

gibbs wrote:....but as a precaution I decided to invest in some protection so after a chat with the online customer service rep for 3M I was able to establish what filter I would need based upon the sets they make for professional spray painters I purchased.... [a professional filter mask]


BTW...I too use a similar mask, even though I use a spray booth! :D And as well, I also use rubber gloves at all times when building and painting. I believe that is indispensable![/quote]

You are correct as far as I can tell under normal circumstances acrylic paints are fairly non toxic so essentially don't drink it and you'll be fine, remember the quote by Paracelsus
“All things are poisons, for there is nothing without poisonous qualities. It is only the dose which makes a thing poison.”


After all you can poison yourself with water if you drink too much in terms of spraying it's the size of the partials which make it potentially toxic which is why I took precautions to minimise exposure before I got the respirator such as always having the window open and spraying before I went out in the morning so by leaving the window open the fumes had time to dissipate before I got back

Now for the explanation a Warning now it's not the most pleasant read

I had to go see the asthma nurse which was when I asked about it and it seems that in the case of the sore throat it was more a result of a few things I have a hernia which causes acid reflux which while generally I have it under control sometimes has a day or two where it's an issue in this case this had happened two days prior.

One of the effects of acid reflux is that it irritates the lining in the back of the throat which gives me a tickly throat/cough opposed to a sore one it also increases mucus production, while annoying this was a good thing in this case and what actually prevented the damage seems to be that the mucus membrane served it's purpose of catching contaminants before they reach the lungs so you can expel them from you body.

Whereas if I had been using enamels the chemicals present in some of them evaporate more readily to form a vapour opposed to an aerosol hence why we can smell the enamels alot more than acrylics so in this case the spray that I inhaled got caught in the mucus much in the same way as things such as pollen and dust does, this then leads to your body either making you cough or sneeze to remove the contaminants, but since this the lining was already irritated the coughing while useful as it removes the contaminants also resulted in a sore throat

whereas with enamels the potential toxins in the vapours don't get caught as easy as the contaminants in the aerosol so are able to reach the lung tissues.

So in this case the spray that I inhaled got caught in the mucus layer meaning that the vast majority of the spray never got to my lungs, this then leads to your body either making you cough or sneeze to remove the contaminants but since this the layer was already irritated the coughing while useful as it removes the contaminants also resulted in a sore throat
and while they cannot guarantee with 100% certainty I won't ever have any problems with my lungs it is highly unlikely that this will be the cause

And as a plus the result of the checkup with the asthma nurse my lungs have never been better and I finally got discharged
after 20 years

But lesson learned considering the cost of the respirator and the replacement cartridges I'm converted as I'd rather have the additional cost every so often now than problems in the future especially now that I'm using lacquer based chemicals which in the correct concentrations can be more toxic than some enamel based products

Also Whiterook depending on what you use you may want to switch over to nitrile gloves instead if rubber as some chemicals can eat through latex

The Respirator
If it is of any interest to anyone here is the respirator related contents of the kit 3M market for professional spray shops

3M™ Half Face Respirator 7500 Series
3M™ Organic Vapour Cartridges 6051, A1 However I used 3M™ Organic Vapour Cartridges 6055, A2 they are both from the same series however A2 cartridges have a higher capacity so a longer life
3M™ ParticulateFilters 5925, P2
3M™ Filter Retainers 501
Last edited by gibbs on Sat Jul 25, 2015 9:47 pm, edited 1 time in total.
My little corner of the internet
Image
https://thearmourfarm.wordpress.com

User avatar
Whiterook
Site Admin
Site Admin
Posts: 7148
Joined: Sat Mar 19, 2011 8:22 pm
Location: Massachusetts, USA

Re: PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby Whiterook » Sat Jul 25, 2015 8:59 pm

Wow, thanks for the explaination...sorry you went through all that but, it's good news that everything is OK.

Interesting on the gloves...thanks. I currently use latex gloves with Aloe Vera. The only chemicals I use beyond acrylics are: Model Masters and Tamiya liquid glues, Squadron Putty, and MicroSol/Microset; but that said, the liquid glues do tend to eat at the surface of the latex, but slowly, so I chuck them before they wear through (usually, because they get covered with paint more than checmicals)....

What are the nitrile gloves like? I looked at a pictture online and they look like more what I see in physician offices; looser and their hands don't seem to sweat like mine do in the tight latex.

As for the mask: I use an AOSafety Respirator (looks close to yours, but with round 8051 Organic Vapor Cartridges). Love it!
If you can't be a good example, be a horrible warning

User avatar
gibbs
Specialist
Specialist
Posts: 265
Joined: Wed Mar 23, 2011 3:42 pm
Location: United Kingdom
Contact:

Re: PACE Airbrush Booth

Postby gibbs » Mon Aug 10, 2015 6:10 pm

Whiterook wrote:Wow, thanks for the explaination...sorry you went through all that but, it's good news that everything is OK.

Interesting on the gloves...thanks. I currently use latex gloves with Aloe Vera. The only chemicals I use beyond acrylics are: Model Masters and Tamiya liquid glues, Squadron Putty, and MicroSol/Microset; but that said, the liquid glues do tend to eat at the surface of the latex, but slowly, so I chuck them before they wear through (usually, because they get covered with paint more than chemicals)....

What are the nitrile gloves like? I looked at a picture online and they look like more what I see in physician offices; looser and their hands don't seem to sweat like mine do in the tight latex.

As for the mask: I use an AOSafety Respirator (looks close to yours, but with round 8051 Organic Vapor Cartridges). Love it!


The filters on yours I'd think would nearly be identical as AOSaftey is owned by 3M, as for seeing nitrile gloves at the doctors offices that's highly likely as it removes the risks linked to latex allergy's I have found the gloves to be slightly loser than latex but still tight enough to give decent dexterity and touch but as you've noted my hands don't really sweat while wearing them meaning I can use the powder free versions so less things to contaminate the surface to cause problems with paint

In respect to chemical resistance have a look at this table http://www.glovenation.com/gloves-chemi ... stance.htm because I often help my brother do work on his car the nitrile glove made more sense

Also if you want to give them a try this site does free samples on the right hand side http://www.glovenation.com/index.html so you could give them a go and see what you think before you spend anything on them
also this
My little corner of the internet
Image
https://thearmourfarm.wordpress.com


Return to “Model Making Tips & Help”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest