JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

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Duncan
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Duncan » Wed Mar 16, 2016 12:38 am

Ah... the Micro Sol isn't for dry transfers.

The touch up job isn't noticeable in your photo. Good job!

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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby McCoy » Wed Mar 16, 2016 6:59 am

I slight detail though. The left hand pistol port don't look like a pistol port at all, it lack the look of beingloose and just pulled in place. A recommendation is that you repaint it a little off-set and also give it a good pin-wash. Really, what is the odds that everytime it's pulled tight that it align perfectly with the rest of the numbering?
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Whiterook » Thu Mar 17, 2016 9:57 pm

Love this build! The texture on the turret Duncan mentioned caught my eye right away, too....gorgeous. I'm liking what aftermarket doodads you picked up. I've a favor to ask: when yiu do the Friuls, can you do a separate thread on the process? I've never done the, and would love a lesson, if you don't mind.
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Thu Mar 31, 2016 5:47 am

McCoy wrote:I slight detail though. The left hand pistol port don't look like a pistol port at all, it lack the look of beingloose and just pulled in place. A recommendation is that you repaint it a little off-set and also give it a good pin-wash. Really, what is the odds that everytime it's pulled tight that it align perfectly with the rest of the numbering?


Great point and one I wish I'd thought of. I'll get on to that.
Okay...after some time the dry transfers began to fall off. It's my own fault because I applied them to a matt finish on a texture I think so I had problems with them. I painted them with THREE coats of Dullcote but they were still lifting. In the end I had to glue some of the corners down with Testors transparency glue and then cover the heck out of them with Tamiya gloss clear...was trying to avoid that but alas I couldn't. I seem to have the problem in hand now but it doesn't look quite as neat as it did sadly.

Duncan, I've used similar products to the MicroSol and MicroSet stuff. I've been using "Mr. MarkSetter" and "Mr MarkSolvent". They're Chinese I believe, probably from Hong Kong. I must say I'm not really that impressed by them. They've been okay on some aftermarket decals I've used but not so great on stock kit decals. They leave stains on the model. Now I'm wondering if that has more to do with the decal quality because aftermarkets are like driving a Rolls Royce compared to some kit decals which are like a two-wheeled tricycle. I must try the Micro ones because I think they're better quality.

So here's where I'm at now. I've applied several filters, mostly light browns. I've also applied the filters uniformly, that is, there are no parts of the model with more or less filter layers. I think the filters started to really show after about five or six layers...the model begins to look dusty and the colour starts to get patchy and blotchy in a good kind of "scale" way.
After that I did some dot-washing with oil paint. That's where you apply dots of oil colour, I used Sienna, Umber, Blue and White. You then blend the dots into the surface with a little white spirit. If you look closely you'll see a couple of spots where the blue is fairly obvious. Luckily there's still some way to go. I've been letting this dry for a couple of days now. Next will be a dark pin-wash I think.

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By way of contrast, here's the original base colour of the turret which has been considerably toned-down by filters...

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More soon. Thanks for looking.
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Sat May 07, 2016 10:31 am

Been trying to add to this for a couple of days now. Getting "Error 403" trying to post pics :( .
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Sun May 08, 2016 2:35 am

Progress...

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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Sun May 08, 2016 2:55 am

Had trouble posting these pics because I think the forum now demands smaller pictures. I usually only had to halve the size of the files my camera generates...any ideas?

Anyway...progress. I've done a little work with oil paint to produce water marks from rain and dew as well as a little dripping rust. I'm not a huge fan of the big, bold rust drips...sometimes they look fantastic but I feel that they're much more at home on ships that are constantly wet and exposed to salt. That stuff corrodes like nobody's business.
I've done my usual trick of applying chipping with a 000 brush by physically painting every chip by hand. It can be tedious unless you enjoy it, which I do, but I'm also a bit of a control freak when it comes to models and I find the sponge method doesn't suit me. I end up with a pattern that unconsciously forms on the surface or the chips end up too big so I do them one at a time.
I use thinned Tamiya acrylic for this and I add a pretty generous amount of black to their red-brown colour...think of the colour of the tracks of the last bulldozer you saw. Deep, dark brown usually. To that colour mix I add Tamiya thinner but any isopropyl alcohol should be fine plus a drop of Windex. I make a small mix in the lid of a two litre milk bottle so not much per session. The Windex extends the rather short working life of the acrylic paint which wants to form a skin pretty fast especially in warmer conditions. A thinner mix allows you to achieve chips rather than blobs which are more rounded in shape and raised from the surface which is actually the opposite of a chip. Later, I will go over the model with a lightened version of the green and apply some to the edges of the more prominent chips. What this does is to create the illusion that the chip is actually UNDER the base colour rather than on top of it...which it actually is.
It's also important to try to create some of what we call "negative chips". This is where some of the base colour is left as little islands inside larger chips.

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Left circle above shows negative chips as dark yellow spots left inside the larger chipped area. Right circle shows use of edging chips with lightened base colour. I haven't even done that very well in the pic but it works as an effect.
Thanks for looking, more soon.
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Mon May 09, 2016 7:37 am

Here's a little PE bucket I knocked up last night. Man...not an easy project.

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The grid on the green mat is 10mm as a size indication.
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Tue May 17, 2016 8:25 am

A little fun with Friulmodel tracks.

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Above are the individual links and the brass wire pins that will connect them. If you're considering trying a set and have never done so before you should really drill out all of the holes on the ends of each link. It's a bit tedious but that's the buzzword with these babies. They take a little cleaning up too as they're moulded much like styrene kit parts so they sometimes have flash and lumps and bumps that need removing.
I said they're tedious and they can be but in the end they're more than worth the effort in my opinion despite the fact that a set can cost as much (in this case about 400% more) as the kit you're using them on. They're the closest thing to real tracks that I've ever seen and they impart a very realistic sag over wheels and guide rollers which is some cases can be a large part of the character of a vehicle. There's nothing worse than tight vinyl tracks that defy gravity or kit indy-link tracks with small but discernible gaps in them poorly hidden on the lower runs.

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Usually, a set of Friuls includes a set of metal sprocket wheels to replace kit wheels which may not be exactly the right width for the tracks. I use the Friul wheels wherever they're included. In the case of this kit they're far more detailed than the kit wheels anyway. Since neither kit nor Friul set provides any clue at to how many links are needed it's best to go slowly. Past experience tells me that once assembled, Friuls are very difficult to pull apart again. For this kit I made up runs of ten links and then glued the pins in place with a drop of CA glue. I then put a small dot on each end link with a black marker. When joining the sets of ten together, these marks tell me where the join pins are so I get the glue in the right holes.
In the end I was pretty much restricted by the kit and the way I'd built it. It would have been easier to assemble the upper hull seperately to the lower because the gap between the upper hull and the final position of the drive sprocket left absolutely no space through which to slide the assembled tracks. I had to leave the drive sprockets off. The tracks will be threaded over the front idler (the drive is at the rear), over the guide rollers and then joined at the back. The sprockets will need to be attached after the tracks are installed. Having dry fit one side it's fiddly but possible.
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Re: JS-2 by Dragon in 1/35

Postby Geek44 » Tue May 17, 2016 8:43 am

In the end it added up to 83 links which I found by joining eighty and test fitting. Finding that to be too few links I added them one at a time temporarily just to get the length of the track right.

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You can see my temporary pins added to the model with the tracks in situ. These could be added easily while I fiddled around getting the drive sprocket into place. These pins were not glued and could be easily removed to allow for permanent pins cut to the correct length.

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Track in place. Now to join the eighty three links for the other side and then paint 'em.
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