Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby Whiterook » Sun Dec 08, 2013 10:36 pm

My knee-jerk reaction was, this was more-or-less a shooting gallery scenario, and those are generally whomp and stomp...and yes, feel kinda pointless. I've experienced a few of them with older systems and from what I can remember of them, there were the following similarities? ....

1. There was a lot of distance between your and the opposing forces. In such a short term game (small number of turns), it came down to snipers taking out pigeons.

2. Lack of cover and difficult terrain. Again, shooting gallery.

3. What was the actual objective? You need tenseness built into the scenario to make it life or death vs. target practice.

If I were playing this scenario, I would have found it more challenging if it were a night extraction of a high value target; it at least two times the turns; and something built into the Event-style format to give the possibility to be surrounded. Dropping into the LZ at the North quadrant and extracting the same seemed a little too loose to me...at night, the helios would have a primary and secondary extraction zone lined up in advance, else it's searching for a needle in a haystack, IMHO.

I don't think this was a balance issue on the scenario...I just feel it was a tad vague?

Hope that's not too critical
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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 8:11 am

Thanks for your comments, Em. I totally agree. I'm equally critical of this scenario. I think a drawback of making an escape scenario in Firepower, and a drawback of the Firepower rules in general, is that you can only activate a few soldiers each turn. There will always be someone who does nothing, which has always seemed a little silly to me. In Firepower it's nearly impossible to "leave no man behind." I think that's probably why they had the Brits enter and leave in the same spot.

CR3 is a little more realistic in that regard. Your side may not activate in a given turn, but once they do you can move all of them. So it would be a little easier to determine separate entry and exit points with those rules.

This would've been better if I had left out the mud rule and allowed the enemies to start closer to the Brits. Then they would've had a lot more enemies to contend with, and they could've gotten some cover and gotten close enough to see them in the dark. I corrected these problems in the assault scenario, and I think you're gonna like the results. My current game is my best yet.
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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 5:03 pm

As much as I hate war, I do have a favorite, and it’s the Falklands War. It was a backyard brawl with a little bit of everything, but none of the nonsense of Nazis, oil, or terrorists.

In late May, a couple of weeks after the Pebble Island raid, the British sent the 2nd Parachute Battalion toward a village called Goose Green on East Falkland, where the Argentine 12th Infantry Regiment were waiting. Wikipedia has a great page on the ensuing battle, including maps, here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Goose_Green.

I played out a small portion of the battle using the Goose Green scenario from the Firepower rule book, again using the rules from Chain Reaction 3.0 (Two Hour Wargames). I was really excited to play this. The battle included armor, artillery, an anti-tank platoon, choppers, anti-aircraft guns, SAS recon, diversionary raids, naval shellings, and even Harriers, two of which were shot down. Unfortunately, I had no way to include any of this in such a small-scale game. But there was some very valiant ground fighting on both sides that day, and that’s what I hoped to portray here.

I played Argentine Sub-Lieutenant Ernesto Peluffo, who led an RI 12 platoon against the Brits’ first assault at Darwin Ridge just before dawn.

Here’s the map with all soldiers from both sides.
Goose Green_01_setup.png
The whole map


There’s no mud this time, so everyone will move faster than before. But the roads are not actually roads this time but trenches, that will count as being in cover. All the hills are rocky this time and will provide cover, also. Victory in this scenario goes to the side controlling more of the eight hills in the left panel. There are 6 Turns in this scenario.

I decided to go ahead and place the 19 British (brown) soldiers this time rather than using the red spots for potential enemies. I thought that might make it more interesting. I rolled dice to get a general idea of where they’d start on the right panel, and then I just hid them behind some hills. I used the nonplayer movement rules from CR3 to control their movements. This was a night raid, but since they’re not SAS they only have four nightsights among them. They also, however, have machine guns, a mortar, and a rocket launcher, as well as a sniper. They also got a free activation prior to Turn 1.

My Argentines (green) of Task Force Mercedes are less experienced, but this time we actually have more nightsights with us, six total. We also have more troops, including three machine gunners, and we’re using AR-10 assault rifles while the Brits only have semi-automatic rifles.

I hid my three infantry squads behind three large hills, out of sight. The plan was to move the six riflemen with nightsights into LOS but in cover following the Brits’ first movement. Those without nightsights can only see six hexes, so I would keep them out of sight until the Brits were close enough to shoot. And this time they’d have to get that close to achieve their goal. So I’m expecting far more action in this scenario than the last.

The British moved ahead at full speed into the cover of the trench at the foot of the hills (I misapplied the CR3 movement rules during this movement, but the results were great). To keep things interesting and realistic, I moved their mortar guy back, since he has to be 31 hexes away to fire according to the Firepower charts. CR3 has no mortar rules, so I’ll just apply the rocket launcher rules to him and say that he can only fire if a teammate has LOS. He won’t be part of the in-sight tests; I’ll just let him fire every other turn since he’ll have to reload. Similarly, the Brit with the rocket launcher has to be six hexes away to fire, so I’ll let him stay back when the Brits advance to take the hills. The sniper rifle can fire up to 100 hexes, so I’ll let the sniper stay back, too.
Goose Green_02_Brit advance.png
British advance (a little too fast)
Goose Green_02_Brit advance.png (210.21 KiB) Viewed 1107 times


Turn 1
There was still no LOS when Turn 1 began, since we were well hidden behind the hills. If we were to activate next I would send everyone with a nightsight into LOS to start picking them off. My guys would be at a disadvantage since they’re less experienced and would be moving, but we outnumbered the Brits and would have plenty of troops left when they get close enough for us to see them. The mortar guy is a problem since there are three hills between us and him. We’d just have to pray.

The Brits activated again to start Turn 1. That might be even better for us. When I rolled for movement of the enemy squads, the 1st squad got three 6s, causing them to stay in the trench to provide cover fire for the 2nd squad. They only get 6 Turns to control several hills, so they’d better get moving soon. The 2nd squad passed 3 dice and moved to a place where they could fire at us, if they could get close enough. They rolled for fast movement and only passed 1 die, which allowed them to advance up to 6 hexes (again misapplying the rules), leaving the sniper and the rocket launcher operator in the trench.

Only one of their riflemen was able to get in a firing position concealed by scrub, and my gunner and I spotted him first. Since I was behind the hill and LOS passed close to the hill, I was in cover (only partially exposed), but the machine gunner was not. An in-sight test determined that the Brit got to react first. He fired once at each of us, missing me but hitting my gunner, which took him out of the fight. I fired back with my pistol but missed since he was moving fast and I couldn’t see him very well. He reacted with a rushed shot, just missing me. I fired again, again missing badly. He fired back and missed, so I kept it up and finally knocked him down and stunned him. He wouldn’t be able to do anything until after the next British activation in Turn 2.
Goose Green_03_first sighting.png
First sighting
Goose Green_03_first sighting.png (69.29 KiB) Viewed 1107 times


Their mortar soldier fired on my position but missed completely. He would have to reload during Turn 2 and couldn’t fire again until Turn 3. I thanked God for my good fortune.

That ended the Brits’ activation, so it was our turn. Since their 2nd squad was so close, we stayed off the hills so the 1st squad couldn’t fire at us while we focused our attack on the 2nd squad. I planned to pick up my wounded gunner’s machine gun and send two squads between the hills to overwhelm the British squad. Of course their sniper and rocket launcher would be major disadvantages for us.

I sent the other squad’s riflemen with nightsights into the trench beyond the hill so they could fire from cover. The British rocket launcher spotted them, and their sniper could see one of them, too. My men could only roll one die for their in-sight test since they were moving and their targets were in cover. The skillful rocket launcher reacted first, firing at the riflemen and wounding them. This was a serious blow since a third of our men with nightsights were now out of the fight, but the others in their squad shook it off and carried on. Fortunately, the rocket launcher would have to be reloaded and wouldn’t be a problem again until Turn 3.
Goose Green_04_rocket shot.png
Rocket shot
Goose Green_04_rocket shot.png (121.66 KiB) Viewed 1107 times


I ordered the right squad up the hill since the 1st British squad couldn’t see them. I’d move my own squad between the hills at the same time to overwhelm the 2nd squad. Two riflemen went up the hill and were spotted by the 2nd Brit squad’s leader and a rifleman ready and waiting in the scrub. The squad leader, armed with a submachine gun, opened fire, killing one of the Argentine soldiers. The British rifleman fired next and missed.

The other brave Argentine rifleman fired full auto at the squad leader, wounding him. The SL rolled 5 star dice and was able to carry on, though he retained only 4 star dice. He fired back with his submachine gun, hitting the rifleman twice and taking him out of the fight. The Argentine squad carried on thanks to good leadership.
Goose Green_05_SL wounded.png
SL wounded
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"...military glory, that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood—that serpent's eye that charms to destroy..." --Abraham Lincoln, 1848

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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Mon Dec 09, 2013 5:23 pm

I picked up the machine gun, keeping out of sight, and sent three of my own riflemen ahead to take on the British squad. “Don’t let the sniper see you,” I said. They bravely ran into the rocks in front of me and were spotted immediately by the British machine gunner. He swept his weapon across the three riflemen, hitting two of them. One was killed and the other wounded. The British SL and the remaining Argentine rifleman reacted simultaneously. The SL concentrated all his SMG fire and hit the rifleman three times, killing him as he tried to jump for cover. I was throwing my men’s lives away against this superior British squad that was well entrenched in cover.
Goose Green_06_3 riflemen hit.png
Three riflemen hit
Goose Green_06_3 riflemen hit.png (48.37 KiB) Viewed 1108 times


Next the SL of the squad to my right took his machine gunner and a rifleman up the hill to try and take out their machine gunner. Unfortunately in the darkness these men of courage had to get close enough so that the entire squad could see them. The British SL could only see our gunner and killed him as soon as he was in sight. Their machine gunner rolled a 6 on his in-sight test, causing him to go prone, and we thanked God. He and one of their riflemen had ducked back and couldn’t fire again until the next British activation. That would be a big help to us.

The Argentine SL couldn’t see the British SL or the machine gunner and fired at the two riflemen still standing. Sadly he missed them both. The surviving Argentine rifleman ran for cover. The last British rifleman fired at the Argentine SL and missed. Both riflemen passed the Received Fire test and fired at the SL again, missing him in the cover of the hill. The SL fired back, hitting one of them and taking him out of the fight. The other ducked down and stayed out of sight.

With most of the British squad unable to fire, I ordered my riflemen with nightsights forward to try and take out the sniper while the squad to my right tried to take down the SL. This time the SL and sniper reacted more slowly, firing at the same time as one of the riflemen. That rifleman missed his targets. The SL hit both of the riflemen, taking them both out of the fight. The sniper was outgunned and went prone, leaving only the SL to fire until the next British activation.

I ordered another rifleman forward to throw a grenade at the British SL. He dropped the grenade. I went prone and was ok, but he was wounded and out of the fight. But the British SL was close enough that he had to go prone, too, leaving none of the British squad standing.
Goose Green_08_dropped grenade.png
Dropped grenade
Goose Green_08_dropped grenade.png (50.22 KiB) Viewed 1108 times


At this point we had lost 11 men to their 1, and it was still Turn 1. Our options now were to keep pounding at their SL, who was the only person who could fire at us for the rest of Turn 1, or stay put and let the whole squad come at us when they activated in Turn 2. There was no way to know which side would activate first in Turn 2. Charging them would be too risky. Surrounded by my dead and wounded comrades, I asked myself what my CO would do in this situation. I decided to have another try with a grenade and ordered yet another man forward to throw it. He too dropped it, and I realized my men were not well trained with grenades. At least he was able to go prone and escape damage.

The Argentine SL to my right could still move one more hex to trigger a new in-sight reaction with the British SL, who was prone but had not ducked back. The Argentine SL was too far away to fire a grenade, but he would have a better chance than his comrades of taking out the enemy SL. And no one else would be able to fire at him in this turn. So he moved to the front of the hill. The British SL fired first but missed since the Argentine SL was in hill cover. He fired back, hitting the other SL twice. The injured SL rolled his four remaining star dice and was ok. They both fired again at the same time, and both were hit and knocked down. Each rolled four star dice. Both carried on but were reduced to three star dice. They got up and kept firing. This time they both missed. They tried again, and both were hit. The Brit received a kill shot, while the Argentine was only stunned. The Brit rolled his three star dice and ended up stunned, while the Argentine’s star dice brought him out of his stun so he could be ready in case the Brits activated next. Unfortunately he also lost another star die, bringing him to only two.
Goose Green_09_SL shootout.png
Squad leader shootout
Goose Green_09_SL shootout.png (45.44 KiB) Viewed 1108 times


Finally the threat of the British squad was diminished for a time. I realized that our last two riflemen with nightsights, in the squad to my left, could safely get to a spot on the hill where they could shoot at the rocket launcher. I signaled the other squad and they went for it, but then they got frightened out there all alone and ducked back.

I stayed prone and readied the machine gun for the next attack. Although the first one had taken a large toll, we now controlled three of the eight hills, and the British would have a tough time getting through the soldiers we had remaining. The rest of the right squad joined their valiant leader at the front of the hill, ready for the Brits to just try and show their heads. My two standing riflemen moved into firing position, too. The squad to the left maintained their position, ready for anything.

Still five turns to go, and with all this action the first turn felt like a Two Hour Wargame all in itself! I messed up at the beginning by letting the Brits move a lot further than they should’ve been able to, but it provided a whole lot of action so I don’t regret it. I learned the rules a lot better during this turn, and the rest of the game should go smoothly.
To be continued…
"...military glory, that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood—that serpent's eye that charms to destroy..." --Abraham Lincoln, 1848

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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Wed Dec 11, 2013 11:33 am

Durnit, I messed up again. Soldiers in rough areas, which includes all hill hexes in this scenario, can't see or be seen unless they're in a hex at the edge of the rough. So much of the above shouldn't have occurred. For example, no one on a rough hill can fire at someone on ground level unless they're at the edge of the hill. I'll apply that rule correctly going forward.
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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby Lucky Luke » Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:33 pm

Ahhh...I can enter the forum and how better way to celebrate than talk about Firepower ? ;)

Well, I'll try to be serious.... (who? me? :mrgreen: )

Talking about scenarios:
If Special Forces are deployed, regular-to-green troops are expected to lose: SF usually deploys with the right hardware and un-human skill level to use it.

I think the scenarios with the SAS are more a simulator of the situations than being 'fair' scenarios...

The morale rule is recommended for SF scenarios: the other side should be running away roughly after a couple of turn's worth of firefight, not a nice way to lose!


Let's do some number-crunching...
VPs bonus:
* The Argie player(11+6=17 men at start) gets 2 VPs per unwonded soldier on the "British" half of map at the end of the game.
* The British player(nine men at start) gets 2 VPs for every man exited on turn 5 (like in the ambush scenario), regardless of wounds.

Without losses, the game is easily won by the Argies...34 to 18,with a delta of 16 VPs; British player can 'delete' these16 VPs with 8 Argies "hit"(=men with any wound). For every Argie hit in excess of 8, the Sas player can lose a man (dead or stuck behind due legs wound)

Eight Argie wounded (or worse!) ? Too many? Nope. If you look again at the SAS activation you'll see a 3/4 for each squad, three activation chits and an activation value of four hexes: the SAS player can activates all the soldiers every sequence chit(eight out of nine men!), SAS can fire 8 times every activation, 24 attacks every turn.

Argies have a 3/2 for each squad: they can activate only 4 hexes per sequence chit, a lowly 12 attacks every turn.

SAS has a double firepower advantage, and with their nightsight, no night modifier (a 20% less chance to hit).

The Argies are doomed? Maybe, but they have a 2:1 men ratio advantage and their weapon have a +10% more chance to hit at some range. With the few nightsights they can harass the British as they wait until the SAS have to retreat or lose the 2 VP per man exited on the last turn, and try to run beyond the goal line (the half map line).

But it's a "lateral thinking" tactics, with an unaware opponent, you can grab some points and if the dice are nice with you... :mrgreen:
V6!

Luca



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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:45 pm

Thanks, Luke, I really appreciate your comments. That's pretty much how it played out, even though I wasn't using the Firepower rules. With the much simpler CR3 rules, each troop has a "reputation" level, and I simply used those to give the SAS higher skills. And the Argies did run away. CR3 doesn't have traditional morale rules, but it has a different type of reaction mechanic that takes morale into account (a Received Fire test, a Man Down test, and a group Cohesion Test, the latter of which caused the Argies to run away after losing three men at once).

In the assault scenario I'm playing now, I gave the British the same rep level as I gave the SAS in the previous scenario. There aren't many rep levels to choose from. That's one reason the Argies lost a dozen men in Turn 1, while the British only lost one. But now the Argies can wait in cover for the Brits to start moving, and things will get a lot tougher for the Brits in the next turn.
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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby Lucky Luke » Thu Dec 12, 2013 6:12 pm

As much as I love these rules, they lack a way for both sides to be moving at the same time, as they often would in real life. Has anyone played a game that has a good way of depicting simultaneous movement?




A good way? Play a FPS !

A joke? Perhaps. :mrgreen:

Let's take these three games:

- Sniper (SPI) http://boardgamegeek.com/images/boardga ... st-edition
- Gunslinger (SPI) http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgame/1044/gunslinger
- Bughunter (SPI-TSR) [new Sniper rules] http://boardgamegeek.com/boardgameexpan ... ion-game-3


In "Sniper" all the actions is performed simultaneously:it is all plotted in advance by the players, a time consuming system...it takes a lot of time before you'll get confortable with the notations.

In "Gunslinger" you stack cards with the actions printed on them and resolve the actions in order with the other player moving your gunslinger(s) around on the map or shooting at somebody. But with more than 4 characters to play and you'll have an headache...

In the 'new' "Sniper" you have the numbers (from 1 to 6) printed on the chits drawn matched with an initiative number of every soldier, if he has a better or equal value, he can do something...nice but there are the chance that you'll have only a chit per turn...!

Firepower is not an answer, is another point of view....!

But I've downloaded CR3 and I'm eager to read it....
V6!

Luca



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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:09 pm

Oh, what a find. Next time I do a Pebble Island SAS raid I'll use the details provided here: http://www-solar.mcs.st-and.ac%20sce14%20.uk/~aaron/SCEN/.html

This scenario includes the planes they were sent to destroy, so they'll actually have something to do before they pop out.

This page has five other platoon-scale scenarios in the Falklands, too! This thread may continue for years.
"...military glory, that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood—that serpent's eye that charms to destroy..." --Abraham Lincoln, 1848

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Re: Falklands Scenario (A Firepower Two Hour Wargame)

Postby josta59 » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:12 pm

"...military glory, that attractive rainbow that rises in showers of blood—that serpent's eye that charms to destroy..." --Abraham Lincoln, 1848


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